Thromb Haemost 2022; 122(05): 662-665
DOI: 10.1055/a-1674-0259
Invited Mini Series: Novel Clinical Concepts in Thrombosis

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Cancer-Associated Thrombosis

Courteney Wiredu
1   Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States
,
Norrisa Haynes
2   Division of Cardiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
3   Leonard Davis Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Carmen Guerra
3   Leonard Davis Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
4   Division of Internal Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
5   Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
6   Department of Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
,
Bonnie Ky
2   Division of Cardiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
5   Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
6   Department of Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
› Author Affiliations
Funding C.W. was supported by a Penn Access Summer Scholars Program. B.K. is supported in part by an American Heart Association Award Strategically Focused Research Network Award in Cardio-Oncology Disparities.

Abstract

Active malignancy increases the risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) by four- to seven-fold. The risk of VTE, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, in patients with cancer varies based on several clinical factors, such as cancer stage and age. However, race and ethnicity are also associated with increased VTE risk. Black (African American) patients with cancer have a higher risk of developing VTE than White patients, while Asian/Pacific Islanders have a lower risk. Studies on cancer-associated thrombosis demonstrate a need to advance our understanding of both the biologic and sociologic underpinnings of the observed differences according to race. Addressing the causes of these disparities can better health outcomes for historically underserved patient populations.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 29 August 2021

Accepted: 18 October 2021

Accepted Manuscript online:
20 October 2021

Article published online:
20 January 2022

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