Klin Monbl Augenheilkd 2021; 238(04): 434-436
DOI: 10.1055/a-1353-5399
Der interessante Fall

Diffuse Bilateral Subacute Placoid Chorioretinitis and Hot Optic Disc as Part of Ocular Manifestations of Neurosyphilis: A Case Report

Diffuse bilaterale subakute plakoide Chorioretinitis und Papillitis als Manifestationsform einer Neurosyphilis: Fallbericht
Linda Oesterle
1  Ophthalmology, Augenzentrum Wil, Sankt Gallen, Switzerland
,
Reinhard Rüesch
2  Department of Ophthalmology (Chairman Prof. Dr. med. Ch. Valmaggia), Kantonsspital St Gallen, Sankt Gallen, Switzerland
,
Margarita G. Todorova
2  Department of Ophthalmology (Chairman Prof. Dr. med. Ch. Valmaggia), Kantonsspital St Gallen, Sankt Gallen, Switzerland
3  Department of Ophthalmology (Chairman Prof. Dr. med. H. Scholl), University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland
› Institutsangaben

Background

Syphilis is a chronic infectious disease caused by a spirochaete bacterium named Treponema pallidum. The disease is generally transmitted by sexual contact, from mother to infant, and also by blood transfusion. Treponema pallidum, if untreated, is able to survive in the human host for decades [1]. Many different ocular presentations of congenital and acquired syphilis have long been described. In the past years, attention has been paid to a clinical presentation resembling acute retinal necrosis, predominantly seen in homosexual and heterosexual men [2], [3], [4]. In acquired syphilis, some clinical presentations, among which include the presence of panuveitis, vitreous cell inflammation, and/or non-elevated placoid lesions, should, however, raise the suspicion of syphilis. Delay in diagnosis of chorioretinitis spreading to the macula, considered to be a rare but clinically distinct complication, might be associated with visual loss and thus require prompt therapy.

Herein, we report on a case of posterior placoid chorioretinitis with papillitis, as a rare re-emerging ocular manifestation of syphilis.



Publikationsverlauf

Eingereicht: 23. September 2020

Angenommen: 28. Dezember 2020

Publikationsdatum:
30. April 2021 (online)

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