Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/a-1312-6758
Training & Testing

Transcranial Stimulation Improves Volume and Perceived Exertion but does not Change Power

1  Physical Education, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Joao Pessoa, Brazil
,
Mauro Mazini-Filho
2  Foundations of Physical Education, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
,
Daltonde Lima-Júnior
1  Physical Education, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Joao Pessoa, Brazil
,
3  Department of Physical Education, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Maicon Rodrigues Albuquerque
4  Department of Sport Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
,
5  Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Physical Education, Recife, Brazil
,
Maria Elisa Caputo Ferreira
2  Foundations of Physical Education, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

This study aimed to analyze the acute effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) on the volume, perceived exertion, and neuromuscular performance measurements in trained and untrained adults. Twenty-four male adults (12 trained and 12 untrained) participated in this single-blind, randomized, and sham-controlled study. The participants performed three back squat repetitions using the 15RM load with maximal concentric velocity to assess neuromuscular performance before tDCS and 30-min after resistance exercise. Next, they were randomly assigned to a-tDCS over M1 or the sham condition. Participants performed ten sets of parallel back squat with 15RM load and repetitions sustained to momentary muscular failure. The total number of repetitions was higher (p<0.05) and perceived exertion was lower (p<0.05) after a-tDCS in both groups. Peak power, velocity, and force decreased in both groups after the RE session (p<0.05), but with a higher rate in untrained individuals (p<0.05). No significant effect was found for peak power, peak velocity, and peak force (p>0.05). This study suggests that using a-tDCS may improve the total volume of repetitions and perceived exertion in trained and untrained individuals.



Publication History

Received: 13 April 2020

Accepted: 03 November 2020

Publication Date:
13 January 2021 (online)

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