Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/a-1263-1124
Physiology & Biochemistry
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Blood Pressure Response to Muscle Metaboreflex Activation is Impaired in Men Living with HIV

Gabriel Gama
1  Laboratory of Physical Activity and Health Promotion, University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
,
Paulo Farinatti
1  Laboratory of Physical Activity and Health Promotion, University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2  Graduate Program in Physical Activity Sciences, Salgado de Oliveira University, Niteroi, Brazil
,
Antonio Crisafulli
3  Department of Medical Science and Public Health, University of Cagliari, Italy
,
Juliana Borges
1  Laboratory of Physical Activity and Health Promotion, University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Funding: This work was partially supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ, grants E-26/202.720/2019, E-26/010.100935/2018, and E-26/202.880/2017) and the Brazilian Council for the Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq, grant 304798/2016-9).
Further Information

Publication History



accepted Published online: 202024 August 2020

Publication Date:
14 October 2020 (online)

Abstract

We investigated the muscle metaboreflex contribution to blood pressure response during dynamic handgrip exercise in men living with HIV (MLHIV) vs. without HIV (Controls). Pressor and heart rate responses were evaluated during metaboreflex activation through post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) method and control exercise session (CER) in 17 MLHIV and 21 Controls. Protocols were performed randomly on the same day, being both sessions composed of 12 min, as follows: a) 3 min at rest, b) 3 min of dynamic handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, c) 3 min of recovery post-exercise with vascular occlusion (occlusion only in PEMI), and d) 3 min of recovery post-exercise without vascular occlusion. To assess metaboreflex response, differences between PEMI and CER in recovery post-exercise were calculated for blood pressure and heart rate. Systolic and mean blood pressure (P<0.01) were superior in the last 2 min of recovery with vascular occlusion at PEMI in relation to CER for both groups. No difference was found between groups for blood pressure and heart rate (P>0.05). However, metaboreflex response for systolic blood pressure was lower in MLHIV vs. Controls (4.05±4.63 vs. 7.61±3.99 mmHg; P=0.01). In conclusion, pressor response during metaboreceptor stimulation was attenuated in men living with HIV, which may suggest loss of muscle metaboreflex sensibility.