Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/a-1255-3083
Training & Testing

Ultra Trail Performance is Differently Predicted by Endurance Variables in Men and Women

Ignacio Martinez-Navarro
1  Department of Physical Education and Sports, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia
2  Sports Health Unit, Vithas Hospital 9 de Octubre, Valencia
,
Antonio Montoya-Vieco
1  Department of Physical Education and Sports, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia
2  Sports Health Unit, Vithas Hospital 9 de Octubre, Valencia
,
Eladio Collado
3  Faculty of Health Sciences, Universitat Jaume I, Castello de la Plana
,
Bárbara Hernando
4  Department of Medicine, Universitat Jaume I, Castello de la Plana
,
Carlos Hernando
5  Sports Service, Universitat Jaume I, Castello de la Plana
6  Department of Education and Specific Didactics, Universitat Jaume I, Castello de la Plana
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

The study aimed to assess the relationship between peak oxygen uptake, ventilatory thresholds and maximal fat oxidation with ultra trail male and female performance. 47 athletes (29 men and 18 women) completed a cardiopulmonary exercise test between 2 to 4 weeks before a 107-km ultra trail. Body composition was also analyzed using a bioelectrical impedance weight scale. Exploratory correlation analyses showed that peak oxygen uptake (men: r=–0.63, p=0.004; women: r=–0.85, p < 0.001), peak speed (men: r=–0.74, p < 0.001; women: r=–0.69, p=0.009), speed at first (men: r=–0.49, p=0.035; women: r=–0.76, p=0.003) and second (men: r=–0.73, p < 0.001; women: r=–0.76, p=0.003) ventilatory threshold, and maximal fat oxidation (men: r=–0.53, p=0.019; women: r=–0.59, p=0.033) were linked to race time in male and female athletes. Percentage of fat mass (men: r=0.58, p=0.010; women: r=0.62, p= 0.024) and lean body mass (men: r=–0.61, p=0.006; women: r=–0.61, p=0.026) were also associated with performance in both sexes. Subsequent multiple regression analyses revealed that peak speed and maximal fat oxidation together were able to predict 66% of male performance; while peak oxygen uptake was the only statistically significant variable explaining 69% of the variation in women’s race time. These results, although exploratory in nature, suggest that ultra trail performance is differently predicted by endurance variables in men and women.



Publication History

Received: 10 May 2020

Accepted: 24 August 2020

Publication Date:
05 October 2020 (online)

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