Hamostaseologie 2020; 40(04): 524-535
DOI: 10.1055/a-1213-2117
Review Article

In Silico Hemostasis Modeling and Prediction

Dmitry Y. Nechipurenko*
1  Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
2  Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
3  Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia
,
Aleksey M. Shibeko*
2  Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
3  Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia
,
Anastasia N. Sveshnikova
1  Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
2  Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
3  Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia
,
Mikhail A. Panteleev
1  Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
2  Center for Theoretical Problems of Physicochemical Pharmacology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
3  Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Computational physiology, i.e., reproduction of physiological (and, by extension, pathophysiological) processes in silico, could be considered one of the major goals in computational biology. One might use computers to simulate molecular interactions, enzyme kinetics, gene expression, or whole networks of biochemical reactions, but it is (patho)physiological meaning that is usually the meaningful goal of the research even when a single enzyme is its subject. Although exponential rise in the use of computational and mathematical models in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis began in the 1980s (first for blood coagulation, then for platelet adhesion, and finally for platelet signal transduction), the majority of their successful applications are still focused on simulating the elements of the hemostatic system rather than the total (patho)physiological response in situ. Here we discuss the state of the art, the state of the progress toward the efficient “virtual thrombus formation,” and what one can already get from the existing models.

* These authors contributed equally to this work.




Publication History

Received: 14 April 2020

Accepted: 06 July 2020

Publication Date:
11 September 2020 (online)

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