Int J Sports Med
DOI: 10.1055/a-1202-1536
Physiology & Biochemistry

Effect of High-velocity Resistance Exercise on 24-h Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Older Women

1  Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Rodrigo Alberto Vieira Browne
2  Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Ricardo Santos Oliveira
1  Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Ludmila Lucena Pereira Cabral
2  Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Luiz Fernando de Farias Junior
3  Graduate Program in Psychobiology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
,
Eduardo Caldas Costa
1  Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
› Author Affiliations
Funding: FFOD was supported by the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES – Brazil). RAVB, LLPC and LFFJ are supported by the CAPES. ECC is supported by the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq; 306744/2019–8).

Abstract

This study investigated the acute post-exercise effect of high-velocity resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive older women. Fourteen volunteers (67.9±5.1 years) performed a high-velocity resistance exercise session (8 exercises using Thera-Band, 3 sets of 6 repetitions as fast as possible in the concentric phase with moderate intensity) and a control session, separated by a 7–10-day period. Ambulatory blood pressure was monitored following 12-h post-sessions and compared between conditions at 1 to 4-h, 5 to 8-h, and 9 to 12-h. Average 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, awake, asleep periods, and blood pressure load were also analyzed. There was a condition by time interaction for systolic ambulatory blood pressure over 12-h post-sessions (P=0.043). It was observed a lower systolic ambulatory blood pressure in the first 4-h period following the high-velocity resistance exercise session compared to the control session (−6.7 mmHg, 95% CI  − 11.6 to −1.8 mmHg; P=0.011). No changes were observed for diastolic ambulatory blood pressure over 12-h post-sessions as well as for the other variables analyzed (P>0.05). In summary, a single high-velocity resistance exercise session elicits a post-exercise antihypertensive effect and may be considered as a strategy to acutely improve blood pressure control in hypertensive older women.



Publication History

Received: 00 00 2020

Accepted: 04 June 2020

Publication Date:
12 August 2020 (online)

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG
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