Int J Sports Med 2020; 41(12): 815-823
DOI: 10.1055/a-1186-1272
Review

Meta-analysis: Resistance Training Improves Cognition in Mild Cognitive Impairment

1  Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
2  Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Bin Li
3  National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Disorders, Department of Geriatrics, Xiangya Hospital Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Jingjing Yang
1  Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Fengling Wang
1  Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Qianyun Tang
1  Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
,
Shuhong Wang
1  Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
› Author Affiliations
Funding: The authors thank the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant no. 2018YFC2002400).

Abstract

This study investigated the benefits of resistance training on cognition in patients with mild cognitive impairment. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases, and seven randomized controlled trials were reviewed. We evaluated the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration’s bias assessment tool. Standard mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for statistical analysis. This meta-analysis assessed three variables: general cognitive function, executive function and working memory. The results indicate that general cognitive function improved significantly (standardized mean difference: 0.53, P=0.04), and further subgroup analyses on frequency and duration per session showed that the subgroups ‘twice a week’ (P=0.01) and ‘duration per session >60 min’ (P=0.0006) exhibited better performance than the subgroups ‘three time a week’ (P=0.47) and ‘duration per session <60 min’ (P=0.53). Additionally, a moderate effect size was found in executive function (standardized mean difference: 0.50, P=0.0003), and there was non-significant effect in working memory (P=0.14). In summary, resistance training may mitigate mild cognitive impairment by improving cognition. Larger-scale studies are recommended to demonstrate the relationship between resistance training and cognition in mild cognitive impairment.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 18 January 2020

Accepted: 13 May 2020

Publication Date:
29 June 2020 (online)

© 2020. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany