Nuklearmedizin 2020; 59(03): 281-283
DOI: 10.1055/a-1151-4592
Case Report

[177Lu]Lu-DOTA-zoledronate therapy – first application in a patient with primary osseous metastatic bronchial carcinoma

Barbara Kreppel
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Florian Christoph Gaertner
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Hojjat Ahmadzadehfar
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
2  Department of Nuclear Medicine, Westfalen Hospital, Dortmund, Germany
,
Ambreen Khawar
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Frank Roesch
3  Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
,
Stefan Kürpig
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Michael Meisenheimer
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Markus Essler
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
,
Ralph Alexander Bundschuh
1  Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Bonn, Bonn, Germany
› Author Affiliations

Background

Radioligand therapies are gaining increasing importance in tumor therapy. With bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals that selectively accumulate in osteoblastic active areas, such as the beta-emiting radionuclides samarium-153 and strontium-89 or the alpha-emitting radium-223, therapy options exist to palliate cancer-induced bone pain [1] [5] or even prolong survival [6]. [153Sm]Sm-EDTMP is approved for osteoblastic bone metastases regardless of the primary tumor, whereas [89Sr]Sr-Chlorid is only approved for palliative pain therapy for bone metastases of prostate cancer [2] [8]. Zoledronic acid conjugated to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA and labeled with lutetium-177 ([177Lu]Lu-DOTA-ZOL) represent a new class of promising radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of bone metastases. The bisphosphonate derivative DOTA-ZOL can also be labeled with gallium-68 for diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET) [7]. Zoledronic acid, a highly potent new generation bisphosphonate, inhibits bone resorption by the osteoclasts and accumulates in osteoblastic bone. Furthermore, lutetium-177 seems to have superior properties for treatment of bone metastases compared to other radioisotopes [3] [4].

We report about a lung cancer patient with osseous metastases, refractory to guideline treatment, who received radioligand therapy with [177Lu]Lu-DOTA-ZOL.



Publication History

Publication Date:
28 April 2020 (online)

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York