Int J Sports Med 2020; 41(11): 744-750
DOI: 10.1055/a-1144-3175
Training & Testing

Curve Sprinting in Soccer: Kinematic and Neuromuscular Analysis

1   Sports and Computer Department, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain
2   Research and Development Department, Football Science Insititute, Granada, Spain
,
Jesús Olivares-Jabalera
2   Research and Development Department, Football Science Insititute, Granada, Spain
3   Physical and Sports Education Department Universidad de Granada, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Granada, Spain
,
Alfredo Santalla
1   Sports and Computer Department, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain
2   Research and Development Department, Football Science Insititute, Granada, Spain
,
Jaime Morente-Sánchez
2   Research and Development Department, Football Science Insititute, Granada, Spain
,
Jose Robles-Rodríguez
5   Faculty of Education, Psychology and Sports Science, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain
,
Bernardo Requena
2   Research and Development Department, Football Science Insititute, Granada, Spain
,
Irineu Loturco
6   NAR - Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, Sport Science, São Paulo, Brazil
7   Sport Science, University of South Wales, Pontypridd, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
8   Department of Human Movement Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

Sprinting in curvilinear trajectories is an important soccer ability, corresponding to ~85% of the actions performed at maximum velocity in a soccer league. We compared the neuromuscular behavior and foot contact-time between outside leg and inside leg during curve sprinting to both sides in soccer players. Nine soccer players (age=23±4.12 years) performed: 3×Sprint linear, 3×Sprint right curve, and 3×Sprint left curve. An ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the differences between inside and outside leg, and Cohen’s d was used to calculate the effect-size. Considering the average data, the performance classification (from best to worst) was as follows: 1. Curve “good” side (2.45±0.11 s), 2. Linear (2.47±0.13 s), and 3. Curve “weak” side (2.56±0.17 s). Comparing linear with curve sprinting, inside leg recorded significant differences (“good” and “weak”; effect size=1.20 and 2, respectively); in contrast, for outside leg, there were no significant differences (“good” and “weak”; effect size=0.30 and 0.49, respectively). Electromyography activity showed significant differences (p≤0.05) during curve sprinting between outside (higher in biceps femoris and gluteus medius) and inside leg (higher activity in semitendinosus and adductor). In summary, inside and outside leg play different roles during curved sprints, but inside leg is more affected by the change from straight to curve sprint.



Publication History

Received: 04 November 2019

Accepted: 09 March 2020

Article published online:
03 June 2020

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