CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Sports Med Int Open 2020; 04(02): E45-E52
DOI: 10.1055/a-1139-1761
Physiology & Biochemistry
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2020

Impact of Ice Slurry Ingestion During Break-Times on Repeated-Sprint Exercise in the Heat

Takashi Naito
1  Department of Sports Research, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Kita-ku, Japan
,
Miki Haramura
2  Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku,Japan
3  Department of Sports Sciences, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Kita-ku, Japan
,
Koji Muraishi
3  Department of Sports Sciences, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Kita-ku, Japan
4  Graduate School of Community and Health Services, Rikkyo University, Niiza-city, Japan
,
Misa Yamazaki
3  Department of Sports Sciences, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Kita-ku, Japan
,
Hideyuki Takahashi
1  Department of Sports Research, Japan Institute of Sports Sciences, Kita-ku, Japan
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 11 November 2019
revised 20 February 2020

accepted 08 March 2020

Publication Date:
04 May 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

The study aimed to investigate the effects of ice slurry ingestion during break times and half-time (HT) on repeated-sprint performance and core temperature in the heat. Seven males performed two different trials as follows: ice slurry (−1°C) or room temperature water ingestion at each break and HT break at 36.5°C, 50% relative humidity. Participants performed 30 sets of 1-min periods of repeated- sprint exercises protocol using a cycling ergometer. Each period consisted of 5 sec of maximal pedaling, 25 sec of pedaling with no workload, and 30 sec of rest; two sets of exercise periods were separated by 10 min of rest. Each break was implemented for 1 min after every 5 sets. The rectal temperature in ice slurry ingestion was significantly lower than that of the room temperature water at 45 set (p=0.04). Total and mean work done was greater in ice slurry ingestion compared to room temperature water ingestion (p < 0.05). These results suggested that ice slurry ingestion during break times and HT break may be an effective cooling strategy to attenuate the rise of core temperature in the second half of exercise and improve the repeated-sprint exercise capacity in the heat.