Rofo 2020; 192(05): 476-477
DOI: 10.1055/a-1138-8783
The Interesting Case

CT appearance of severe, laboratory-proven coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a Caucasian patient in Berlin, Germany

Alexander Gross
1  Department of Radiology and Interventional Therapy, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
,
Dorina Thiemig
2  Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
,
Franz-Wilhelm Koch
2  Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
,
Martin Schwarz
1  Department of Radiology and Interventional Therapy, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
,
Sven Gläser
2  Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
,
Thomas Albrecht
1  Department of Radiology and Interventional Therapy, Vivantes-Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Germany
› Author Affiliations

Introduction

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new lower respiratory tract illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), originating from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, in December 2019 [1] [2]. Despite enormous efforts to limit its propagation, the virus has spread rapidly across various countries around the world. At the end of January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. As of 8 March 2020, 105 586 infections and 3584 deaths have been recorded worldwide, the vast majority of cases being located in China [3]. While infection rates are slowing in China, numbers of new infections are still exponentially growing in many other countries, South Chorea and Italy being the most severely affected [3].

Several publications have characterized CT-morphological changes of COVID-19 in Chinese patients [4] [5] [6] [7]. To our knowledge, however, only one publication has shown CT images of two Caucasian patients examined in Western countries so far [8]. Here we present the case with CT imaging of a Caucasian patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Berlin, Germany.



Publication History

Publication Date:
19 March 2020 (online)

© Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Stuttgart · New York