CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Endosc Int Open 2020; 08(05): E598-E606
DOI: 10.1055/a-1122-8566
Original article

Colonoscopy videos on YouTube: Are they a good source of patient education?

Dhruvil Radadiya
1  Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, United States
,
Alexei Gonzalez-Estrada
2  Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, United States
,
Jorge Emilio Lira-Vera
3  Division of Gastroenterology, Hospital Español de México, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City
,
Katia Lizarrga-Torres
4  Special Consultant, Private Practice, Panama City, Panama
,
Shayan Sinha Mahapatra
5  Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Florida, United States
,
Ricardo Murguia-Fuentes
6  Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Mexico
,
Sebastian Niezen
7  Anahuac University School of Medicine, Mexico
,
Kaushik Mohan
8  University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, United States
,
Chakradhar Reddy
9  Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, United States
,
Kalpit Devani
9  Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, United States
› Author Affiliations
  

Abstract

Background and study aims Colonoscopy is an effective tool to prevent colorectal cancer. Social media has emerged as a source of medical information for patients.YouTube (a video sharing website) is the most popular video informative source. Therefore, we aimed to assess the educational quality of colonoscopy videos available on YouTube.

Methods We performed a YouTube search using the keyword “colonoscopy” yielded 429 videos, of which 255 met the inclusion criteria. Colonoscopy Data Quality Score (C-DQS) was created to rate the quality of the videos (–10 to +40 points) based on a colonoscopy education video available on the Ameican Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) website. Each video was scored by six blinded reviewers independently using C-DQS. The Global Quality Score (GQS) was used for score validation. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the similarity of the scores among reviewers.

Results Professional societies had the highest number of videos (44.3 %). Videos from professional societies (6.94) and media (6.87) had significantly higher mean C-DQS compared to those from alternative medicine providers (1.19), companies (1.16), and patients (2.60) (P < 0.05). Mean C-DQS score of videos from healthcare providers (4.40) was not statistically different than other sources. There was a high degree of agreement among reviewers for the videos from all sources (ICC = 0.934; P < 0.001).

Discussion YouTube videos are a poor source of information on colonoscopy. Professional societies and media are better sources of quality information for patient education on colonoscopy. The medical community may need to engage actively in enriching the quality of educational material available on YouTube.

Supplementary material



Publication History

Received: 07 August 2019

Accepted: 05 February 2020

Publication Date:
17 April 2020 (online)

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