CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Sports Med Int Open 2020; 4(02): E32-E38
DOI: 10.1055/a-1116-0749
Training & Testing
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2019

Effects of Overspeed or Overload Plyometric Training on Jump Height and Lifting Velocity

Nicolay Stien
1  Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Hogskulen pa Vestlandet - Campus Sogndal, Sogndal, Norway
,
Morten Strate
1  Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Hogskulen pa Vestlandet - Campus Sogndal, Sogndal, Norway
,
Vidar Andersen
1  Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Hogskulen pa Vestlandet - Campus Sogndal, Sogndal, Norway
,
Atle Hole Saeterbakken
1  Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Hogskulen pa Vestlandet - Campus Sogndal, Sogndal, Norway
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 03 October 2019
revised 07 January 2020

accepted 09 February 2020

Publication Date:
01 April 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of overspeed or overload plyometric training on jump height and lifting velocity in resistance trained females without plyometric training experience. Fifty-six participants (age: 21.2±1.7 years; body mass: 65.1±8.2 kg; height: 168.0±5.9 cm) were randomly allocated to either an overspeed (n=18), overload (n=18), or passive control (n=16) group. The two training groups completed 18.7±1.7 sessions consisting of three different plyometric exercises with overspeed or overload over eight weeks. Apart from the external loading, the two training modalities were identical. Following the training period, the changes in the recorded variables were not significantly different from those in the control group, nor did the training groups differ from each other. The training groups improved peak and average lifting velocity in the 40 and 60% of body mass loading conditions (9.50–33.37%, p=<0.001–0.038), whereas only the average lifting velocity improved in the 80% of body mass loading condition (OS: 14.47%, p<0.001 and OL: 23.13%, p<0.001). No significant changes occurred in the control group (9.18–13.55%, P=0.062–0.980). Overspeed and overload plyometric training may be viable methods for improving lifting velocity, but not squat jump height, in a population without plyometric training experience.