CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Sports Med Int Open 2020; 4(01): E27-E31
DOI: 10.1055/a-1089-5051
Training & Testing
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2019

Relationship between VO2max, under Water Swim Testing and Artistic Swim Solo Performance

Eric Viana
1  Kinesiology, University of Ontario Institute of Technology Faculty of Health Sciences, Oshawa, Canada
,
David J Bentley
2  Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, Australia
,
Heather M. Logan-Sprenger
1  Kinesiology, University of Ontario Institute of Technology Faculty of Health Sciences, Oshawa, Canada
3  Canadian Sports Institute Ontario, Toronto, Canada
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 12 August 2019
revised 25 November 2019

accepted 17 December 2019

Publication Date:
01 April 2020 (online)

  

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between: 1) laboratory-determined cycling peak oxygen consumption (VO2max) and AS performance in a new underwater swim test (UWST), and 2) cycling VO2max and ventilatory threshold (VT) in cycling and performance score during a simulated AS solo routine. Trained artistic swimmers (n=15, 15.8±0.8 yrs., height: 169.1±5.4 cm, body mass: 57.1±6.3 kg) completed (1) a maximal incremental cycle test to exhaustion to determine VO2max, (2) the UWST which comprised 275 m of freestyle and underwater breaststroke, and (3) a simulated solo competition where artistic swimming elements were evaluated by five FINA judges. There was a significant correlation between mean element score and (i) VO2max (48±4 mL. kg.min−1, r=0.44, p=0.05), and (ii) UWST (r=−0.64, p=0.005). However, there was an insignificant relationship between cycling ventilatory threshold and mean element score (r=–0.36, p=0.10). In addition, the results demonstrate a significant relationship between HR at the ventilatory threshold and peak HR of the UWST (r=–0.64, p=0.014). The results of this study demonstrate that VO2max is an important determinant of AS performance. In addition, the UWST appears to be a useful indicator of AS performance.