CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd 2019; 79(08): 854-862
DOI: 10.1055/a-0958-9519
GebFra Science
Review/Übersicht
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

The Academization of Midwifery in the Context of the Amendment of the German Midwifery Law: Current Developments and Challenges

Article in several languages: English | deutsch
Claudia Plappert
1  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Institut für Gesundheitswissenschaften, Abteilung für Hebammenwissenschaft, Tübingen, Germany
,
Joachim Graf
1  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Institut für Gesundheitswissenschaften, Abteilung für Hebammenwissenschaft, Tübingen, Germany
,
Elisabeth Simoes
2  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Department für Frauengesundheit, Forschungsinstitut für Frauengesundheit, Tübingen, Germany
3  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Stabsstelle für Sozialmedizin, Tübingen, Germany
,
Stefani Schönhardt
1  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Institut für Gesundheitswissenschaften, Abteilung für Hebammenwissenschaft, Tübingen, Germany
,
Harald Abele
1  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Institut für Gesundheitswissenschaften, Abteilung für Hebammenwissenschaft, Tübingen, Germany
4  Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Department für Frauengesundheit, Tübingen, Germany
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 14 April 2019
revised 02 June 2019

accepted 17 June 2019

Publication Date:
12 August 2019 (online)

  

Abstract

Germany faces the challenge of enforcing the academization of midwifery training in the upcoming months in order to comply with Directive 2013/55/EU. This paper outlines the related developments and challenges. At the moment, midwifery training in Germany is still predominantly carried out in technical colleges. In 2019, less than 20% of midwifery training places were college-based. The current standard training is a dual training system which combines vocational training with academic-based courses, but this approach will no longer be feasible once the EU directive has been fully implemented. Although the existing draft legislation completely transfers midwifery training to institutions of higher education, various aspects of this concept have remained vague and do not take account of the laws on higher education in the individual federal states. Moreover, if midwifery training is to be provided by both universities and colleges, this will lead to quite different levels of academization within a relatively small professional group. The concept that universities offer primary qualifications comes closest to the required quality standards for professional, science-based, practical and evidence-based midwifery training.