Int J Sports Med 2019; 40(06): 416-422
DOI: 10.1055/a-0877-7028
Nutrition
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Sweat Loss and Hydration Habits of Female Olympic, Varsity and Recreational Ice Hockey Players

Jessica Lynne Bigg
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
,
Alexander Shand Davis Gamble
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
,
Tyler Fredrick Vermeulen
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
,
Stephanie Michelle Boville
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
,
Greg S. Eskedjian
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
,
Matthew Stephen Palmer
2  Human Kinetics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Canada
,
Lawrence L. Spriet
1  Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted 08 March 2019

Publication Date:
23 April 2019 (online)

Abstract

This study measured sweat losses, voluntary fluid intake, sodium balance, and carbohydrate intake of female ice hockey players during on-ice practices at the Olympic, varsity, and recreational levels. Testing was conducted on 25 Canadian Olympic players, 21 varsity, and 21 recreational players. The average sweat rate for the Olympic players (0.99±0.08 L/h) was significantly greater than both the varsity (0.67±0.05 L/h, p=0.001) and the recreational players (0.42±0.03 L/h, p<0.001), and the varsity players also had a significantly greater sweat rate than the recreational athletes (p=0.016). Total fluid intake was significantly greater for both the Olympic (p=0.001) and varsity players (p=0.007) compared to the recreational group. Only 3 of 25 Olympic players lost>1.5% BM and 4 others lost>1% BM, with no players in both the varsity and recreational teams losing>1% BM. Half of the Olympic players consumed some carbohydrate during practice, but most of the varsity and recreational players did not. In conclusion, sweat rates in female ice hockey players during practices were proportional to competitive level. Fluid intake was similar between groups and resulted in only a few athletes at the Olympic level being at risk of excess body mass loss.