Int J Sports Med 2019; 40(06): 376-384
DOI: 10.1055/a-0836-9011
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Cerebral and Muscle Oxygenation during Repeated Shuttle Run Sprints with Hypoventilation

Xavier Woorons
1   Univ. Lille, Univ. Artois, Univ. Littoral Côte d’Opale, EA 7369 – URePSSS – Unité de Recherche Pluridisciplinaire Sport Santé Société, F-59000 Lille, France
2   ARPEH, Association pour la Recherche et la Promotion de l’Entraînement en Hypoventilation, 18 Rue Saint Gabriel 59800 Lille, France
,
Olivier Dupuy
3   Université de Poitiers. Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Laboratoire Move, EA 6314, Poitiers, France
,
Patrick Mucci
1   Univ. Lille, Univ. Artois, Univ. Littoral Côte d’Opale, EA 7369 – URePSSS – Unité de Recherche Pluridisciplinaire Sport Santé Société, F-59000 Lille, France
,
Gregoire P. Millet
4   ISSUL, Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Lausanne, Building Synathlon, Campus Dorigny 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
,
Aurelien Pichon
3   Université de Poitiers. Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Laboratoire Move, EA 6314, Poitiers, France
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted 16 January 2019

Publication Date:
21 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Ten highly-trained Jiu-Jitsu fighters performed 2 repeated-sprint sessions, each including 2 sets of 8 x ~6 s back-and-forth running sprints on a tatami. One session was carried out with normal breathing (RSN) and the other with voluntary hypoventilation at low lung volume (RSH-VHL). Prefrontal and vastus lateralis muscle oxyhemoglobin ([O2Hb]) and deoxyhemoglobin ([HHb]) were monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), gas exchange and maximal blood lactate concentration ([La]max) were also assessed. SpO2 was significantly lower in RSH-VHL than in RSN whereas there was no difference in HR. Muscle oxygenation was not different between conditions during the entire exercise. On the other hand, in RSH-VHL, cerebral oxygenation was significantly lower than in RSN (−6.1±5.4 vs−1.5±6.6 µm). Oxygen uptake was also higher during the recovery periods whereas [La]max tended to be lower in RSH-VHL. The time of the sprints was not different between conditions. This study shows that repeated shuttle-run sprints with VHL has a limited impact on muscle deoxygenation but induces a greater fall in cerebral oxygenation compared with normal breathing conditions. Despite this phenomenon, performance is not impaired, probably because of a higher oxygen uptake during the recovery periods following sprints.