CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Ultrasound Int Open 2018; 04(03): E85-E90
DOI: 10.1055/a-0647-1575
Original Article
Eigentümer und Copyright ©Georg Thieme Verlag KG 2018

MRI-Ultrasound Fusion Imaging for Diagnosis of Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis – A Critical Appraisal

Judith Berger
1  Ziekenhuis Bronovo, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Den Haag, Netherlands
4  Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, gynecology, Leiden, Netherlands
,
Onno Henneman
2  Ziekenhuis Bronovo, Radiology, Den Haag, Netherlands
,
Johann Rhemrev
3  Ziekenhuis Bronovo, Gynecology, Den Haag, Netherlands
,
Maddy Smeets
3  Ziekenhuis Bronovo, Gynecology, Den Haag, Netherlands
,
Frank Willem Jansen
4  Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, gynecology, Leiden, Netherlands
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 22 November 2017
revised 13 April 2018

accepted 12 May 2018

Publication Date:
24 September 2018 (online)

Abstract

Purpose

It was the aim of our study to evaluate this procedure using pelvic anatomical landmarks in order to assess the accuracy of fusion imaging and to critically evaluate the applicability in daily practice.

Methods

In a prospective, single center study, 10 patients with clinical signs of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) were selected. We measured the distance between the landmark organ and the target shown by the software system (measurement 1). Measurement 2 depicts the distance between the landmark and the nearest calibration point. The calibration inaccuracy was measured as a third type of measurement (measurement 3).

Results

Measurement 1: the average distance between the organ landmark to the target was 13.6 mm (range: 0–96 mm). Measurement 2: in 31 of the 40 attempts (77.5 %), we could measure the distance from the landmark organ to the nearest calibration point. The average distance was 34.4 mm (range: 0–69 mm).

Measurement 3: A perfect match was seen in 6 of 20 attempts (30.0 %). There was a deviation in 14 of the 20 attempts (70.0 %). The mean distance was 11.1 mm (range: 6–23 mm). Conclusion Although very promising, MRI-ultrasound fusion imaging (MUFI) currently cannot be readily implemented into daily practice as a routine evaluation of DIE.