Planta Med 2018; 84(12/13): 881-885
DOI: 10.1055/a-0644-2723
Biological and Pharmacological Activity
Original Papers
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

In vivo Antimalarial and Antitrypanosomal Activity of Strychnogucine B, a Bisindole Alkaloid from Strychnos icaja [*]

Claire Beaufay**
1   Pharmacognosy Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium
,
Allison Ledoux**
2   Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, CIRM, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium
,
Olivia Jansen
2   Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, CIRM, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium
,
Annélise Bordignon
2   Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, CIRM, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium
,
Senzhi Zhao
3   Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America
,
Christiana N. Teijaro
3   Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America
,
Rodrigo B. Andrade
3   Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America
,
Joëlle Quetin-Leclercq
1   Pharmacognosy Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium
,
Michel Frédérich
2   Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, CIRM, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 28 February 2018
revised 08 June 2018

accepted 12 June 2018

Publication Date:
21 June 2018 (online)

Abstract

Strychnogucine B is a bisindole alkaloid previously isolated from Strychnos icaja that possesses promising in vitro antiplasmodial properties. This compound was synthesized in four steps from (−)-strychnine. As no acute toxicity was observed at the highest tested cumulative dose of 60 mg/kg, its in vivo antimalarial activity was determined intraperitoneally at 30 mg/kg/d in a Plasmodium berghei murine model. In the Petersʼs 4-d suppressive test, this alkaloid suppressed the parasitaemia by almost 36% on day 5 and 60% on day 7 compared to vehicle-treated mice. In addition to this interesting antimalarial activity, it showed moderate in vitro antitrypanosomal activity but no in vivo activity in an acute Trypanosoma brucei model. It was also inactive in vitro on Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. This highlights its selective antimalarial efficacy and leads to further investigation to assess its potential as new antimalarial lead compound.

* Dedicated to Professor Dr. Robert Verpoorte in recognition of his outstanding contribution to natural product research.


** These authors contributed equally to the work.


Supporting Information