Planta Med 2018; 84(09/10): 653-661
DOI: 10.1055/a-0587-5991
Biological and Pharmacological Activity
Original Papers
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

A Bivalent Role of Genistein in Sprouting Angiogenesis

Sarah Berndt
1   School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, University of Lausanne, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Mark E. Issa*
1   School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, University of Lausanne, Geneva, Switzerland
,
Gilles Carpentier*
2   Laboratoire CRRET, Faculté des Sciences et Technologie, Université Paris Est Créteil, Créteil Cedex, France
,
Muriel Cuendet
1   School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, University of Lausanne, Geneva, Switzerland
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

received 15 November 2017
revised 26 February 2018

accepted 02 March 2018

Publication Date:
14 March 2018 (online)

Abstract

The effects of genistein on angiogenesis remain poorly understood. Some studies claim an antiangiogenic effect and others claim a pro-angiogenic one. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if genistein may exhibit bivalent angiogenic effects. To address this question, genistein angiogenic modulatory effects were examined using an in vitro 3D angiogenesis model using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this model, a bivalent effect of genistein was demonstrated on sprouting angiogenesis, with angiogenic stimulation at low concentrations (0.001 – 1 µM) and inhibition at higher ones (25 – 100 µM). Enhancement of the endothelial tube formation correlated with an increase in human umbilical vein endothelial cell metabolic activity and proliferation. Inhibition of angiogenesis correlated with a decreased metabolic activity, proliferation, and migration. Moreover, high concentrations of genistein influenced human umbilical vein endothelial cell morphology. Expression of genes involved in the angiogenic process in response to genistein was measured to study the mechanism of action. Secretome profiling revealed that angiogenic regulators were modulated with genistein treatment. These results suggested a bivalent effect of genistein on human umbilical vein endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis, and further investigations on the benefit of genistein for cancer chemoprevention, cancer treatment, or pro-angiogenic therapies have to be carefully considered.

* Mark E. Issa and Gilles Carpentier contributed equally to this work.


Supporting Information