CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) 2019; 54(01): 060-063
DOI: 10.1016/j.rbo.2017.11.004
Original Article | Artigo Original
Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia. Published by Thieme Revnter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Prevalence of Radiographic Signs of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Asymptomatic Patients and Non-Athletes[*]

Article in several languages: português | English
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Murilo Gobetti
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Anderson Yutaka Tatei
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Guilherme Guadagnini Falótico
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Gustavo Gonçalves Arliani
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
,
Eduardo Barros Puertas
1  Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Departamento de Ortopedia e Traumatologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP, Brasil
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

20 September 2017

06 November 2017

Publication Date:
01 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective

Femoroacetabular impingement has been described as an anatomical variation of the proximal femur and/or acetabular rim, impinging the hip joint. A portion of the population asymptomatic in the hip may present radiographic changes from femoroacetabular impingement. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of these signs in asymptomatic and sedentary males.

Methods

This was a clinical, observational, primary, cross-sectional, controlled study. A total of 32 male volunteers aged between 18 and 40 years, asymptomatic in the hip and sedentary, were selected from a university hospital orthopedic emergency room. All patients underwent standard anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. The measurements of the alpha angle, the retroversion index, the ischial spine signal, and the posterior wall sign were analyzed.

Results

The mean age was 29 years (18-40 years old). The prevalence of radiographic signs of femoroacetabular impingement using an alpha angle of 67o was of 53.1%; with an alpha angle of 82o, it was of 31.2%. The mean alpha angle was 67o (52.4-88.2o), with 35.9% of the hips classified as borderline and 6.3% as pathological. The mean alpha angle for the right side was 67.5o (52.5-88.2o), and, for the left, it was 66.6o (53.1-86.9o). The mean retroversion index was 0.048 (right side: 0.044; left side: 0.052). The spine signal was positive in 15.6%, and the posterior wall sign, in 20.3% of the cases.

Conclusion

This study showed that the prevalence of radiographic signs in a population of asymptomatic and sedentary adult men was high (31.2%). New studies are required to explian the actual clinical significance of this finding.