CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Rev Bras Ortop (Sao Paulo) 2019; 54(05): 597-600
DOI: 10.1016/j.rbo.2017.09.020
Relato de Caso | Case Report
Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia. Published by Thieme Revnter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

External Iliac Artery Laceration Caused by Hip Prosthesis Migration[*]

Article in several languages: português | English
1  Serviço de Ortopedia, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
,
Mário Moreira
2  Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
,
Luís Antunes
2  Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
,
Alfredo Gil Agostinho
3  Serviço de Imagem Médica, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
,
Manuel Fonseca
2  Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
,
António Albuquerque
2  Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

27 July 2017

13 September 2017

Publication Date:
27 August 2019 (online)

Abstract

Hip arthroplasty is a common and safe intervention in orthopedic surgery. However, the proximity of this joint to large vessels makes the occurrence of vascular injury a rare but serious and possibly lethal complication of this surgical technique. Acute vascular injuries in the context of a hip arthroplasty have variable etiologies and clinical presentations, and are more common in revision surgeries and in situations of medial intrapelvic migration and of chronic infection of the hip prosthesis. In the present article, the authors present a case of acute and late major vascular complication in the context of hip arthroplasty revision. The patient developed an acute laceration of the external iliac artery caused by chronic and progressive medial intrapelvic acetabular migration of the hip prosthesis associated with chronic infection.

* Work developed at the Orthopedic Service, Hospital and University Center of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. Originally published by Elsevier Ltda.