CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · International Journal of Epilepsy 2014; 01(02): 069-074
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijep.2014.11.001
Original Article
Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.

Status epilepticus in adults: A study from Nigeria

Lukman Femi Owolabi
a  Department of Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano PMB 3452, Nigeria
,
Aliyu Ibrahim
a  Department of Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano PMB 3452, Nigeria
,
Alhassan Datti Mohammed
b  Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano PMB 3452, Nigeria
,
Shakirah D. Owolabi
c  Department of Psychiatry, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Bayero University, Kano PMB 3452, Nigeria
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 24 May 2014

Accepted: 04 November 2014

Publication Date:
04 May 2018 (online)

  

Abstract

Background Status epilepticus (SE) is a common neurologic emergency. Immediate treatment to stop seizure activity and prompt diagnostic evaluation to recognize potentially treatable causes are paramount in the management of SE. Thus, increased awareness of presentation, etiologies, and treatment of status epilepticus SE is central in the practice of critical care medicine. However, there is a paucity of information on SE from Nigeria.

Objective We evaluated the clinical profile and predictors of one-month outcome in a group of Nigerian patients with SE.

Methodology Patients with SE were recruited from the medical, high dependency unit, intensive care unit and accident and emergency departments of a tertiary hospital from 2008 to 2013. The outcome was assessed using Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). The outcome, which was categorized into dead (GOS = 1) or alive was analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model.

Result A total of 76 patients was studied. The four most common underlying etiologies were stroke, antiepileptic drug (AED) non-compliance, CNS infections and metabolic derangement. Fifty-nine (77.6%) patients survived. Duration of seizure, delay in initiation of treatment (Odd ratio (OR) = 4.4, 95% CI = 1.17–16.56), refractory status epilepticus (OR = 87.1, 95% CI = 12.94–781.1) were significantly associated with death. On multivariate analysis, however, refractory status epilepticus remained an independent predictor of death.

Conclusion Our study showed that the most common underlying etiologies in SE were stroke, antiepileptic drug non-compliance CNS infections and metabolic derangement. Duration of seizure, delay in treatment and refractory the SE were significantly associated with death, but refractory seizure was an independent predictor of death in SE.