International Journal of Epilepsy 2015; 02(02): 084-086
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijep.2014.06.002
Case Report
Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd.

Status epilepticus as presenting manifestation of H1N1 infection

Aastha Takkar
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Manoj Kumar Goyal
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Manish Modi
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Parampreet S. Kharbanda
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Lakshminarayana Yaddanapudi
b  Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Vivek Lal
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
,
Sudesh Prabhakar
a  Department of Neurology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
› Author Affiliations

Subject Editor:
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 05 November 2013

Accepted: 29 June 2014

Publication Date:
06 May 2018 (online)

  

Abstract

Background During the global H1N1 pandemic, neurological complications were reported in approximately 6–10% of children suffering from H1N1 infection, but only rarely in adults. Generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) as a presenting manifestation of H1N1 infection in an adult is exceedingly rare and has not been reported in literature. We report a patient who presented to us with GCSE as a presenting manifestation of H1N1 infection who improved following appropriate antiviral treatment.

Methods and results This 20-year-old gentleman presented to us with history of fever followed by GCSE of 24 h duration. He was treated symptomatically and was evaluated in detail. He was diagnosed to be suffering from H1N1 infection based on appropriate serological tests. After start of antiviral therapy, he improved and is doing well at 4 months follow up.

Conclusion This case report further expands the spectrum of clinical findings associated with sporadic H1N1 infection. A possibility of H1N1 infection should be considered in all patients who present with GCSE without any obvious cause so that appropriate diagnostic tests and treatment can be carried out at the earliest.