Homeopathy 2004; 93(03): 144-150
DOI: 10.1016/j.homp.2004.04.004
Original Paper
Copyright ©The Faculty of Homeopathy 2004

Permanent physico-chemical properties of extremely diluted aqueous solutions of homeopathic medicines

V. Elia
1  Department of Chemistry, University “Federico II” of Naples, Complesso, Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia 80126, Naples, Italy;
,
S. Baiano
1  Department of Chemistry, University “Federico II” of Naples, Complesso, Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia 80126, Naples, Italy;
,
I. Duro
1  Department of Chemistry, University “Federico II” of Naples, Complesso, Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia 80126, Naples, Italy;
,
E. Napoli
2  Department of Mathematics of the High School “Vittorio Emanuele II, via Barbagallo 32, 80126, Naples, Italy
,
M. Niccoli
1  Department of Chemistry, University “Federico II” of Naples, Complesso, Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia 80126, Naples, Italy;
,
L. Nonatelli
1  Department of Chemistry, University “Federico II” of Naples, Complesso, Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia 80126, Naples, Italy;
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

Received10 November 2003
revised22 March 2004

accepted05 April 2004

Publication Date:
19 December 2017 (online)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to obtain information about the influence of successive dilutions and succussions on the water structure. ‘Extremely diluted solutions’ (EDS) are solutions obtained through the iteration of two processes: dilution in stages of 1:100 and succussion, typically used in homeopathic medicine. The iteration is repeated until extreme dilutions are reached, so that the chemical composition of the solution is identical to that of the solvent. Nine different preparations, were studied from the 3cH to 30cH (Hanhemannian Centesimal Dilution). Four of those were without the active principle (potentized water). Two different active principles were used: Arsenicum sulphuratum rubrum (ASR), As4S4, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D). The solvents were: a solution of sodium bicarbonate and of silicic acid at 5×10−5 M (mol/l) each, and solutions of sodium bicarbonate 5×10−5, 7.5×10−5 and 10×10−5 M (mol/l) in double-distilled water. The containers were Pyrex glass to avoid the release of alkaline oxide and silica from the walls. Conductivity measurements of the solutions were carried out as a function of the age of the potencies. We found increases of electrical conductivity compared to untreated solvent. Successive dilution and succussion can permanently alter the physico-chemical properties of the aqueous solvent. But we also detected changes in physio-chemical parameters with time. This has not previously been reported. The modification of the solvent could provide an important support to the validity of homeopathic medicine, that employs ‘medicines without molecules’. The nature of the phenomena here described remains still unexplained, nevertheless some significant experimental results were obtained.

 
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